May 12, 2016

Donna Gullette Named Outstanding UAMS Woman Faculty Member

Donna Gullette (center), Ph.D., A.P.R.N., associate dean for practice and professor in the College of Nursing, is awarded the 2016 Outstanding Woman Faculty Award.

Donna Gullette, Ph.D., A.P.R.N., associate dean for practice and professor in the College of Nursing, is awarded the 2016 Outstanding Woman Faculty Award.

Donna Gullette, Ph.D., A.P.R.N., associate dean for practice and professor in the UAMS College of Nursing, received the 2016 Outstanding Woman Faculty Award from the UAMS Women’s Faculty Development Caucus.

Gullette, who is also director of the college’s Master of Nursing Science (M.N.Sc.) program, was recognized April 28 at the caucus’ annual dinner.

“Dr. Gullette truly demonstrates the essence of an outstanding nurse and an outstanding woman faculty by leading by example in her administrative duties, faculty role and clinical practice,” said Sara L. Jones, Ph.D., A.P.R.N., an assistant professor in the College of Nursing, in her nominating letter. “She is committed to the mission and integrity of the college and university.”

Other nominees were: Martha Phillips, Ph.D., associate professor in the College of Public Health; Mayumi Nakagawa, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences (CPPS) program in UAMS’ Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute; Marjan Boerma, Ph.D., associate professor in the College of Pharmacy; and Nicki Hilliard, Pharm.D., professor in the College of Pharmacy.

Gullette came to UAMS in 2005 as an associate professor in the College of Nursing’s M.N.Sc. program and became a professor in the program in 2009. She’s served as associate dean for practice and director of the MNSc program at UAMS since 2011.

Gullette has authored or co-authored several peer-reviewed articles and abstracts and lectured internationally. She’s served as principal investigator or co-investigator on multiple studies on topics including the reduction of sexual risk behaviors among rural African-American cocaine users and the alcohol use and HIV risk behaviors in college students.